Tags: Timentin

Specific Anti-Infective Agents

Antibiotics Before prescribing a specific antibiotic, clinicians should be able to answer these questions: •  How does the antibiotic kill or inhibit bacterial growth? •  What are the antibiotic’s toxicities and how should they be monitored? •  How is the drug metabolized, and what are the dosing recommendations? Does the dosing schedule need to be modified in patients with renal dysfunction? •  What are the indications for using each specific antibiotic? •  How broad is the antibiotic’s antimicrobial spectrum? •  How much does the antibiotic cost? Clinicians should be familiar with the general classes of antibiotics, their mechanisms of action, and their major toxicities. The differences between the specific antibiotics in …

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Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials. Determinants of Antimicrobial Efficacy Measurement of antimicrobial activity in vitro Susceptibility testing is indicated for any bacterial pathogen warranting chemotherapy. Drugs that irreversibly destroy the ability of an organism to replicate, and perhaps in the process destroy the structural integrity of the organism, are microbicidal. Drugs that reversibly impair replicating ability, with this function being restored when drug concentrations fall below critical inhibitory levels, are microbiostatic. In quantitative …

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Ticarcillin Disodium and Clavulanate Potassium

C15H14N2NaO6S2 C8H9NO5•K C15H16N2O6S2•C8H9NO5 • Ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium is a fixed combination of ticarcillin disodium (a semisynthetic extended-spectrum penicillin antibiotic) and the potassium salt of clavulanic acid (a b-lactamase inhibitor); clavulanic acid synergistically expands ticarcillin’s spectrum of activity against many strains of b-lactamase-producing bacteria. Cautions Adverse effects reported with ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium are similar to those reported with ticarcillin alone. For information on adverse effects reported with ticarcillin and other extended-spectrum penicillins, see Cautions in the Extended-Spectrum Penicillins General Statement 8:12.16.16. • Hypersensitivity Reactions Rash, pruritus, urticaria, and fever have been reported with ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium. In addition, arthralgia, myalgia, chills, chest discomfort, erythema multiforme, toxic …

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Ticarcillin Disodium and Clavulanate Potassium: Dosage and Administration

• Reconstitution and Administration Ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium is administered by IV infusion over 30 minutes. • IV Infusion Vials of ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium labeled as containing a combined potency of 3.1 g of the drugs are reconstituted by adding approximately 13 mL of sterile water for injection or sodium chloride injection to provide a solution containing approximately 200 mg of ticarcillin per mL and 6.7 mg of clavulanic acid per mL. The vial should be shaken until the drug is dissolved. For intermittent IV infusion, reconstituted solutions of ticarcillin disodium and clavulanate potassium containing approximately 200 mg of ticarcillin per mL should be further diluted to a …

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Penicillins

Overview The penicillins comprise several subgroups of agents with a wide range of bacterial coverage and efficacy. Each penicillin molecule contains a basic β-lactam structure fused to a five-membered ring. Because of their broad spectrum of activity and availability in oral form, the penicillins are commonly used in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and have become the drugs of choice in treating many common infections. The penicillins are divided into the following groups: natural penicillins, aminopenicillins, and the extended-spectrum penicillins. The natural penicillins (e.g., penicillin G) have the narrowest spectrum. They are active only against the gram-positive cocci; in community-acquired pneumonia, they are active essentially against S. pneumoniae only. The aminopenicillins …

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Penicillins

Overview The penicillins comprise several subgroups of agents with a wide range of bacterial coverage and efficacy. Each penicillin molecule contains a basic β-lactam structure fused to a five-membered ring. Because of their broad spectrum of activity and availability in oral form, the penicillins are commonly used in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis and have become the drugs of choice in treating many common infections. The penicillins are further divided into the following groups: natural penicillins, aminopenicillins, and the extended-spectrum penicillins. The natural penicillins (e.g., penicillin G) have the narrowest spectrum. They are active only against the gram-positive cocci and, with regard to acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, …

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Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis: Current therapies

Overview Numerous highly effective pharmacological agents are available to treat acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis). TABLE:Pharmacological Management of Underlying Disease During an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Bronchitis summarizes the general pharmacological agents and classes used to manage acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis. The primary therapies used in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis treat the causative infection (antibiotics), relieve symptoms (bronchodilators), and treat the underlying inflammation (corticosteroids). TABLE :Current Therapies Used for Acute Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis summarizes the leading antibiotic therapies used to treat the infection. Most acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis cases require empiric antibiotic therapy because of the difficulty in definitively distinguishing exacerbations of …

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Timentin (Ticarcillin and Clavulanic acid)

Timentin 3.2 g Ticarcillin and Clavulanic acid 1. What Timentin is and what it is used for Read indications for use if you want to order Ticarcillin and Clavulanic acid online What Timentin is Timentin 3.2 g (called ‘Timentin’ in this leaflet) is a penicillin antibiotic for intravenous (IV) infusion. It contains two different medicines, ticarcillin (present as ticarcillin sodium) and clavulanic acid (present as potassium clavulanate). What Timentin is used for Timentin is used to treat infections in different parts of the body caused by bacteria. 2. Before you have Timentin Before buy  Ticarcillin and Clavulanic acid online, read information about the drug Do not have Timentin if you: are allergic …

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Sepsis

Description of Medical Condition The systemic response to infection; it encompasses a broad array of clinical manifestations and overlaps with inflammatory reactions to other clinical insults (e.g., severe trauma or burn) • Bacteremia: Bacteria in the blood; may have no accompanying symptoms • Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) inflammatory reaction to different clinical insults manifest by two of the following: (1) temperature >38°C or90/min; (3) respiratory rate >20/min or PaC02 12,000/mm3, 10% immature forms (bands) • Sepsis: SIRS with documented infection (typically bacterial) • Septic shock: Sepsis induced hypotension (systolic BP 40 mmHg drop from baseline) despite adequate fluid resuscitation plus hypoperfusion abnormalities (oliguria, lactic acidosis, acute change in mental status) …

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