Tags: Fungizone

Candidiasis Mucocutaneous

Description of Medical Condition A mucocutaneous disorder caused by infection with various species of Candida. Candida is normally present, in very small amounts, in the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, and female genital tract. • Candida vulvovaginitis — infection on the vaginal mucosa, often associated with cutaneous vulvar involvement • Orophatyngeal candidiasis — infection of the oral cavity (“thrush”) and/or pharynx. • Candida esophagitis — usually associated with an immunosuppressed host • Gastrointestinal candidiasis — gastritis, sometimes with ulcers, usually associated with thrush. The small and large bowel can also be affected. • Angular cheilitis — fissures formed by Candida infection at the corners of the mouth. System(s) affected: Skin/Exocrine, Gastrointestinal Genetics: …

Continue Reading...

Blastomycosis

Description of Medical Condition An uncommon, systemic, fungal infection with a broad range of manifestations including pulmonary, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement System(s) affected: Skin/Exocrine, Pulmonary, Musculoskeletal, Renal/Urologic, Endocrine/Metabolic Genetics: N/A Incidence/Prevalence in USA: Ranges from 0.4-4 cases per 100,000 population per year. Higher prevalence in states bordering the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Sporadic cases occurring in other areas. Predominant age: Adults, but 10-20% of cases occur in children Predominant sex: Male > Female Medical Symptoms and Signs of Disease • Acute infection – Onset may be abrupt or insidious – May be asymptomatic and self-limiting – Incubation period 30-45 days – Fever, chills, myalgias, arthralgias – Cough initially nonproductive, then …

Continue Reading...

Antifungal Agents

Fungi are eukaryotes, and they share many of the structural and metabolic characteristics of human cells. As a result, designing agents that affect fungi without harming human cells has proved difficult. One major difference between the two cell types is the primary sterol building block used to form the plasma membrane. The fungal plasma membrane consists of ergosterols; the major sterol component of the human plasma membrane is cholesterol. This difference has been exploited in the development of two classes of drugs. The polyenes act by binding to ergosterol and disrupting the fungal membrane. These agents are fungicidal. The azoles inhibit ergosterol synthesis, and lowered ergosterol levels results in fungal membrane …

Continue Reading...

Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials. Determinants of Antimicrobial Efficacy Measurement of antimicrobial activity in vitro Susceptibility testing is indicated for any bacterial pathogen warranting chemotherapy. Drugs that irreversibly destroy the ability of an organism to replicate, and perhaps in the process destroy the structural integrity of the organism, are microbicidal. Drugs that reversibly impair replicating ability, with this function being restored when drug concentrations fall below critical inhibitory levels, are microbiostatic. In quantitative …

Continue Reading...

Management of Bacterial Meningitis

Central nervous system infections, especially bacterial meningitis, are frequently life-threatening and usually constitute medical emergencies that require accurate and prompt treatment. (Portions of this section about meningitis have previously been published [Swartz and O'Hanley 1987] and are reproduced with permission of the publisher, Scientific American Medicine, New York. [Send permission to section editor.]) Fortunately, advances in methods of diagnosis and treatment developed during the past 15 years have significantly improved the prognosis associated with many of these illnesses. New diagnostic methods (such as latex agglutination and polymerase chain reaction) supplement rather than supplant cerebrospinal fluid studies. The cerebrospinal fluid studies frequently provide important initial information needed for clinical and microbiologic diagnosis; …

Continue Reading...

Antifungal Drugs

Fungal infections are particularly serious and common among neutropenic, immunocompromised patients who have received prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotics. A number of systemic fungal infections (e.g., histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and paracoccidioidomycosis) can also afflict otherwise healthy persons. Until recently, only amphotericin B was available to treat systemic fungal infection. However, with the rapid development and clinical assessment of azole compounds, a number of these agents are also considered appropriate for treatment of fungal infections. Amphotericin B is a polyene antibiotic that exerts its antifungal effect by binding to sterol moieties in the membranes of fungi. This causes pores in the cell wall, eventually causing leakage of low-molecular-weight cytoplasmic components. This effect, coupled with amphotericin’s …

Continue Reading...

Amphotericin B (Fungilin, Fungizone, Abelcet, Fungisome, Amphocil)

• Amphotericin B, an amphoteric polyene macrolide, is an antifungal antibiotic. Drug Interactions Systematic drug interaction studies have not been performed to date using amphotericin B cholesteryl sulfate complex, amphotericin B lipid complex, or amphotericin B liposomal. The fact that drug interactions reported with conventional IV amphotericin B could also occur with these lipid-based or liposomal formulations of the drug should be considered. • Nephrotoxic Drugs Since nephrotoxic effects may be additive, the concurrent or sequential use of IV amphotericin B and other drugs with similar toxic potentials (e.g., aminoglycosides, capreomycin, colistin, cisplatin, cyclosporine, methoxyflurane, pentamidine, polymyxin B, vancomycin) should be avoided, if possible. Intensive monitoring of renal function is recommended …

Continue Reading...

Fungizone Intravenous (Amphotericin)

Fungizone Intravenous (Amphotericin) 1. What Fungizone Intravenous is and what it is used for Read indications for use if you want to order  Amphotericin online The name of your medicine is Fungizone Intravenous. Fungizone Intravenous contains the active ingredient amphotericin, which belongs to a group of medicines called anti-fungal antibiotics. Fungizone Intravenous is used to treat serious infections caused by yeasts and certain fungi. 2.   Before being given your medicine Before buy  Amphotericin online, read information about the drug You should not be given this medicine if you: are allergic (hypersensitive) to amphotericin or any of the other ingredients of Fungizone Intravenous Take special care with Fungizone Intravenous if you: have any kidney …

Continue Reading...

Amphotericin B

Drug Approvals British Approved Name Modified, rINN INNs in other languages (French, Latin, and Spanish): Amfotericin; Amfotericin B; Amfotericina B; Amfotericinas B; Amfoterisiini; Amfoterisiini B; Amfoterisin; Amfoterisin B; Amfoterycyna b; Amphotericin; Amphotericine B; Amphotericinum; Amphotericinum B; Anfotericina B. C47H73NOl7= 924.1. CAS — 1397-89-3. ATC — A01AB04; A07AA07; C01AA03; J02AA01. Pharmacopoeias. In China, Europe, International, Japan, and US. European Pharmacopoeia, 6th ed. (Amphotencin B Amphotericin BP 2008). A mixture of antifungal polyenes produced by the growth of certain strains of Strepiomyces nodosus or by any other means. It consists largely of amphotericin B. It occurs as a yellow or orange powder. The potency is not less than 750 units per mg with …

Continue Reading...
CLOSE
CLOSE