Tags: Aminoglycoside

Giardia: Clinical Syndromes

After ingestion of G lamblia cysts, 5-15% of patients will have asymptomatic cyst passage, and 25-50% of patients will have diarrhea. From 35% to 70% of these patients will have no evidence of infection. The three manifestations of infection include asymptomatic cyst passage, self-limited diarrhea, and chronic diarrhea with associated malabsorption and weight loss. Factors related to each of these manifestations are unknown but are believed to be related to specific host factors, parasite load, and virulence variation among G lamblia isolates. 1. ACUTE GIARDIASIS Clinical Findings A. Signs and Symptoms. After ingestion of cysts, an incubation period of 3-20 days exists before symptom onset. At the time of presentation, patients …

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Amebic Liver Abscess

Clinical Findings A. Signs and Symptoms. Amebic liver abscess is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of amebiasis. Patients may note right-upper-quadrant pain that is either dull or pleuritic in nature. Often pain is referred to the right shoulder. Less than 50% of patients have an enlarged liver. In the acute setting, patients typically manifest fever. If symptoms have been present for > 2 weeks, fever is present in less than half of patients. Respiratory symptoms, such as cough, can occur even in the absence of pulmonary disease and may be the only complaint. In the subacute setting, weight loss is common. Diarrhea is found in less than one-third of patients with …

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Actinomyces

Essentials of Diagnosis “Sulfur granules” in specimens and sinus tract drainage: hard, irregularly shaped, yellow particles measuring from 1 to 5 mm in size Gram-positive branching filaments arranged in ray-like projections under the microscope Colonies with characteristic “molar tooth” appearance Production of extensive fibrosis with “woody” induration No specific antibody or antigen detection tests General Considerations A. Epidemiology. The Actinomyces species are facultative anaerobes that commonly inhabit the oral cavity, the gastrointestinal tract, and the female genital tract, where they exist as commensals. Diversity within this genus is broad, which has led to taxonomic revision and reclassification of some species as members of the Arcanobacterium genus, eg, Actinomyces pyogenes. Disease occurs …

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Other Mycobacteria

Essentials of Diagnosis Demonstration of the acid-fast bacillus. Infections more common in immunocompromised hosts. Infections mainly pulmonary or soft tissue. General Considerations The increasingly relative importance of the atypical mycobacteria, many of which are ubiquitous in the environment, was recognized with the decline in tuberculous disease. Generally, atypical mycobacteria are unusual causes of disease in patients who are immunocompetent but can in immunocompromised hosts such as AIDS and cancer patients. Most infections caused by atypical mycobacteria are skin and soft tissue abscesses, sometimes following pulmonary infection or implantation of prosthetic devices. There have been a few reports of epidemics of iatrogenic infection with atypical mycobacteria, associated with injection of contaminated materials. …

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Brucella, Francisella, Pasteurella, Yersinia, & Hacek

BRUCELLOSIS Essentials of Diagnosis • Suspected in patients with chronic fever of unknown etiology who have a history of occupational exposure or come from a high prevalence area. • Leukopenia. • Blood culture or bone marrow cultures on appropriate media. • Serum antibody titer = 1:160. • Polymerase chain reaction. General Considerations Brucellosis (also called undulant fever, Mediterranean fever, Malta fever) is an infection that causes abortion in domestic animals. It is caused by one of six species of Brucella coccobacilli. It may occasionally be transmitted to humans, in whom the disease could be acute or chronic with ongoing fever and constitutional symptoms without localized findings. A. Epidemiology. Brucellosis is transmitted …

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Yersiniosis

Essentials of Diagnosis • Suspected in a child living in or traveling from a high-prevalence area who has fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea followed by a reactive polyarthritis. • Yersinia spp. are recovered from cultures of specimens of stool, mesenteric lymph nodes, blood, or abscess material. • Inoculation of duplicate sets of cultures for incubation at 37 and 25 °C, respectively, enhances recovery of the microorganisms. General Considerations A. Epidemiology. Conditions that are associated with increased risk for Yersinia spp. infections (yersiniosis) include iron overload states (such as in patients who receive chronic blood transfusions or those with hemochromatosis) and the use of desferrioxamine, a bacterial siderophore. Infections caused by Y …

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Tularemia

Essentials of Diagnosis • Suspected in patients with fever, lymphadenopathy, and skin lesions who have a history of animal exposure (including to wild animals, ticks, or deerflies) or are coming from a high prevalence area or in laboratory personnel who work with Francisella spp. • Blood culture or other biologic specimen cultures on appropriate culture media. • Serum antibody titer = 1:160 or a fourfold increase or decrease in titer. General Considerations Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia (also called rabbit fever or deerfly fever), an infectious disease that occurs primarily in animals. It may occasionally cause human disease, which most often manifests itself by one or more skin …

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Toxin-Mediated Infections

1. TETANUS Tetanus is a disease of global incidence produced by the toxin of Clostridium tetani. The risk of acquiring it increases in people > 60 years of age and in neonates, especially in Third World countries where poor sanitary conditions predispose to umbilical stump contamination. Immunization campaigns have played a crucial role in bringing about the observed decreasing incidence in the United States. The pathogenesis of tetanus involves the absorption of preformed toxin, or, less commonly, invasion of toxin-producing organisms from contaminated wounds; it may complicate surgical wounds colonized with C tetani. Incubation periods vary depending on the portal of entry. The toxin tetanospasmin blocks the transmission of inhibitory neurons, …

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Branhamella Catarrhalis: Clinical Syndromes

B catarrhalis causes bronchitis and pneumonia in patients with underlying lung disease, especially chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It is also a rare cause of invasive disease, including meningitis, endocarditis, bacteremia without a focus, septic arthritis, and cellulitis. In addition, it is a recognized cause of acute conjunctivitis and is periodically mistaken as Neisseria gonorrhoeae in newborn infants with conjunctivitis. B catarrhalis occasionally colonizes the genital mucosa and has been reported as a cause of urethritis. Clinical Findings A. Signs and Symptoms. The signs and symptoms of B catarrhalis acute otitis media and sinusitis are indistinguishable from those present when acute otitis media and sinusitis are caused by other pathogens (Box 8). …

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Haemophilus Influenzae: Clinical Syndromes

H influenzae was first isolated during the 1892 influenza pandemic and was originally believed to be the causative agent of influenza. Although subsequent studies revealed the fallacy of this idea, H influenzae has proved to be a common cause of localized respiratory tract and systemic disease, including meningitis, epiglottitis, pneumonia, pyogenic arthritis, cellulitis, otitis media, and sinusitis, among others (Box 1). 1. MENINGITIS Meningitis is the most common and serious form of invasive H influenzae type-b disease. In the mid-1980s, before the introduction of effective vaccines, ~ 10,000-12,000 cases of H influenzae type-b meningitis occurred in the United States each year, and 95% of cases involved children < 5 years old. …

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